british-history:

Lord Nelson Wounded During the Siege of Calvi
12 July 1794
On this day in British history, 12 July 1794, Lord Horatio Nelson sustained an eye wound that ultimately caused him to go blind in that eye. During the War of the First Coalition, Nelson participated in the siege of French revolutionary forces in Calvi, a town on the French island of Corsica. While British forces prepared to assault the island, Nelson directed a continuous bombardment of the enemy positions. Early on the morning of 12 July, Nelson was at one of the forward batteries when a shot struck one of the sandbags protecting the position, spraying stones and sand. Nelson was struck by debris in his right eye and was forced to retire from the position, although his wound was soon bandaged and he returned to action. The British ultimately prevailed and Calvi surrendered on 10 August, but Nelson’s right eye had been irreparably damaged and he eventually lost sight in it.

british-history:

Lord Nelson Wounded During the Siege of Calvi

12 July 1794

On this day in British history, 12 July 1794, Lord Horatio Nelson sustained an eye wound that ultimately caused him to go blind in that eye. During the War of the First Coalition, Nelson participated in the siege of French revolutionary forces in Calvi, a town on the French island of Corsica. While British forces prepared to assault the island, Nelson directed a continuous bombardment of the enemy positions. Early on the morning of 12 July, Nelson was at one of the forward batteries when a shot struck one of the sandbags protecting the position, spraying stones and sand. Nelson was struck by debris in his right eye and was forced to retire from the position, although his wound was soon bandaged and he returned to action. The British ultimately prevailed and Calvi surrendered on 10 August, but Nelson’s right eye had been irreparably damaged and he eventually lost sight in it.


Morning Tea by Yuliya Bahr

Morning Tea by Yuliya Bahr

nevver:

Stormy weather, Dalton Portella

beautifulmars:

Intersection of Dark-Capped Ridges and Dark-Capped Plains

beautifulmars:

Intersection of Dark-Capped Ridges and Dark-Capped Plains

Pulled together a quick rough DnD 3.5 startup yesterday with friends.  It was so rough and confusing learning a new system by throwing myself in the fire, but it was so fun.  (Also I tend to learn most of my rp’s by jumping straight into the fire before I feel prepared.)

Our team seems rather on our way to be brigands.  We have a streetwise city rogue, a large scythe-wielding sellsword half-elf fighter, a professor sorcerer discredited from the universities for his theories and me.  I am a teenage elf bard who decided to runaway and start life early and likely get into trouble. 
I’m pretty sure we might end up brigands.  We managed to convince the sorcerer stealing might not be so bad if it involves stealing tomes and from goblins. (I still think he doesn’t fully trust us)

—-

Hopefully I will be well learned enough by this to set something up for college this next semester.

For Faber, the inspiration for this new, illustrated narrative came from his recently diagnosed brain tumor. The tumor was benign, but it would spread if he didn’t take a daily injection of medication.

Reflecting on the illness that fired his imagination, Faber “had the thought that when I took these injections, I was sending a little group of soldiers into my body, fighting on my behalf to rebuild my system. Then it all just came together.”

Faber imagined the toy canisters as vials of medicine drifting toward the head of a giant, comatose robot that was infected with a virus. The medicine’s active ingredient was an army of nano-size creatures that arrived in pill-shaped capsules, entered the titan’s body, and fought to liberate it from the virus. The story played out in a microscopic world, but for its “part-organic, part-machine” inhabitants, the scale was sweepingly vast.

Faber provided visual depictions of the island and its inhabitants and also suggested to his colleagues at LEGO a name for the new toy: Bionicle, a combination of the words biological and chronicle .

-Excerpt from Brick by Brick by David C. Robertson, on the creation of Bionicle.

I did not know this. It’s nice to know that the big twist was planned from the beginning, and it makes all the design choices feel so much more meaningful.

(via projectiscariot)

Wow.

Three cheers for Christian Faber. It’s amazing to see someone turn unfortunate circumstances into powerful creative energy, and it’s clear that Bionicle owes a great deal to that energy. I’m glad his ”Toa” were (have been) successful in their mission.

(via outofgloom)


A fallen Toa of Air meeting a future Toa of Air

A fallen Toa of Air meeting a future Toa of Air

You Makuta think we’re weak because we don’t kill our enemies. But sometimes, killing can be a mercy. Sometimes the worst thing you can do to an enemy is let her live.
==
Imakuta-ou akai seya ki jaui o-pa ta o pira’o rakharhu. Arakai ivaka lahi-se. Ivaka iraranohi ki ou pira’i kyavo ikau’ai-aki-pa.
Gali Nuva, Swamp of Secrets (via outofgloom)

outofgloom:

For those interested, here’s a full gloss for Gali Nuva’s quote, with notes. I’ve split it into 4 chunks:

1.

i-makuta-ou        akai     seya   ki     jaui     o-pa

of-makuta-you   it.OBJ   think   that  weak   we-PRS

"You Makuta think that we’re weak"

Notes:

- The complex i-makuta-ou would translate literally to “you of Makuta”.

mat2.

ta         o      pira-o             rakha-rhu

bcse.   we   enemy-our   kill-NEG

"because we don’t kill our enemies."

Notes:

- The verb rakha has been coined as an equivalent of “kill”, “to cause to be in a state of system-abnormality”

3.

arakai   ivaka              lahi-se

killing    sometimes   mercy-POSSIB

"But sometimes, killing can be mercy."

Notes:

The noun arakai “killing” is derived from an older stage of rakha, *rakayaraka-ia > a-raka-i > arakai.

- The modifier ivaka ”sometimes” derives from the complex i-vaki-a "lit. ‘during part of time’", from vaki ”lit. ‘part-of-time’” and the circumfix i-…-a “in, at, on; during”.

4.

ivaka    i-rara-nohi  ki    ou   pira-i        kya-vo    i-kau-ai-aki-pa

smtms. of-bad-thg  that you enemy-to do-ABIL  of-life-her-initiative-PRS

Literal: “Sometimes [the thing-of-most-badness that you can do to enemy] (is) [initiating-of-her-life]”

Orig: “Sometimes the worst thing you can do to an enemy is let her live.”

Notes:

- The complex i-rara-nohi is a compound consisting of ra-ra, a reduplication of ra “system-abnormality”, meaning “very bad, most badness” and nohi, used as a generic term for “thing” (although this would imply a physical thing). 

- The complex i-kau-ai-aki is also a compound and should be divided as follows: [[i-kau-ai]-aki], with a possessive suffix -ai attached to kau “life process”.

deadmanswrench:

GALI
Finally I post a thing. Sorry for the lack of art, y’all! My life has been incredibly packed for the last more than a month, really, as a result of which I’ve been left totally drained. I also have a couple other design projects going on that have been sucking my creativity, as well as some drawing for work, which is awesome. But now we’re finally in the slow season at work so I’ll hopefully be back in action more soon.
I really need to do the one-quick-sketch-a-day thing again. That was good for me.

deadmanswrench:

GALI

Finally I post a thing. Sorry for the lack of art, y’all! My life has been incredibly packed for the last more than a month, really, as a result of which I’ve been left totally drained. I also have a couple other design projects going on that have been sucking my creativity, as well as some drawing for work, which is awesome. But now we’re finally in the slow season at work so I’ll hopefully be back in action more soon.

I really need to do the one-quick-sketch-a-day thing again. That was good for me.